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5 Reasons to Take NMN Supplements in Your Younger Years

5 Reasons to Take NMN Supplements in Your Younger Years

anthony-loera anthony-loera
5 minute read

Many of the benefits of NMN (nicotinamide mononucleotide) are due to delays in aging and related diseases; there are many good reasons to start taking NMN supplements before retirement.

 

1. NMN Supplements Can Support Healthier Skin

 

In our 30s, the appearance of our skin begins to shift gradually downwards. What starts as minor crow's feet and sunspots that we had in our early years can turn into severe wrinkles, crepe-like rough skin, thin as we progress older. A method to stop or slow down the process might be to complete with NMN (nicotinamide mononucleotide) before the condition goes from worse to worse.

 

Exposure to excessive ultraviolet (UV) radiation, mainly from UVB radiation, is the primary external cause that triggers photoaging -an expression used to describe premature skin aging due to repeated exposure to light.

 

Several studies have investigated how increasing NAD concentrations in the skin can prevent photoaging and help maintain a healthy external appearance. One study found that introducing NMN (nicotinamide mononucleotide) into human and mouse skin cells shields them from UV damage by blocking oxidative stress and inflammation. Further analysis revealed that cell regeneration of the skin after sun damage was favored by the growth of the enzyme necessary to create NMN. In addition, a third study found that a mix of healthy bacteria and NMN (nicotinamide mononucleotide) enhanced antioxidant activity, decreased skin inflammation, and increased collagen production and thickness, which is our skin's most significant protein.

 

Based on the findings of this study, adolescents or adults in middle age might want to consider having NMN supplements to improve the health of their skin, especially those frequently exposed to the sun. [1]

 

2. NMN Supplements Support Female Fertility

 

Women can now become pregnant later than previously thought possible; the idea of pregnancy is generally considered a symptom of reproductive health that primarily affects younger women. When a woman is in her mid-thirties and beyond, the number of viable eggs and the risk of getting pregnant naturally diminishes yearly, resulting in around 15% of women suffering from reduced fertility.

 

As assisted reproductive methods such as IVF (IVF) are increasingly popular, growing NAD+ levels may be a more straightforward method to boost fertility. Although research on this subject is not extensive, two studies involving mice support this idea.

 

A study recently released in Cell Reports discovered that female mice treated using NMN over ten days experienced an inverse decline effect due to age in egg counts, which led to a boost in egg quality and functioning. The highest percentage of mature eggs was produced with lower doses of NMN, that is, 200 mg/ kilogram of body weight (mg/kg/day), showing better results than the greater dosage of 1,000 mg/kg/day.

 

Similar results were also observed in the mouse study in February, which showed that smaller doses of NMN supplementation have the most significant improvement in fertility markers and egg quality over higher doses. [2]

 

3. NMN Supplements Backing Liver Health After Alcohol Consumption

 

About two-thirds of American adults like to drink one or two glasses of wine to unwind after their day. However, they might not want to suffer the deteriorating liver health that goes with it. Young adults tend to drink too much, which could cause liver problems in a short period. It is best to protect your livers when drinking.

 

Enhancing liver NAD+ levels with NMN (nicotinamide mononucleotide) is a possible way to prevent alcohol damage to the liver. A study in mice found that daily drinking for six weeks had adverse effects on the liver, while daily injections of NMN (nicotinamide mononucleotide) helped prevent this damage. While further research is required, the study suggests increasing liver NAD+ levels with supplementing NMN (nicotinamide mononucleotide) could be an effective method to improve the health of your liver when you've completed your second glass. [3]

 

4. NMN Supplements Support a Healthy Weight

 

All people are at risk of gaining weight; however, being overweight in the twenties is associated with excessive weight gain in the later years of adulthood and an increased chance of adverse health results. 

 

In addition, children of obese or overweight women tend to have more weight and negative metabolic consequences, so it is essential to maintain appropriate weight during younger adulthood.

 

In a groundbreaking 2016 study, researchers showed that NMN (nicotinamide mononucleotide) supplementation could effectively stop age-related body weight loss in mice. NMN (nicotinamide mononucleotide) reduces body fat, increases energy metabolism, and increases physical activity, which is vital in maintaining a healthy weight. [4]

 

5. NMN Supplements Support Physical Performance

 

In addition to helping with weight loss, supplementation with NMN (nicotinamide mononucleotide) can boost muscle growth, endurance, endurance, and physical performance, qualities that young adults aspire to. Within one of the few human studies of NMN (nicotinamide mononucleotide) in China, a team of researchers found that mixing NMN (nicotinamide mononucleotide) with exercise improved various indicators of aerobic function in healthy adults ranging from 27-50 in a dose-dependent way. This means that higher levels of NMN (1200 mg per day) yielded a more meaningful result than the less pronounced levels of 300 mg. [5]

 

In rodents that mixed exercise with supplements, NMN (nicotinamide mononucleotide) showed more blood flow and increased endurance for running, suggesting that an increase in NAD could help with various performance components. [6]

 

To learn more about RevGenetics Advanced NMN Supplements and its other benefits, click this link to read more articles on NMN!

 

 

 

References:
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0925443921002209

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211124720300838

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s40246-019-0251-1

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fphar.2016.00258/full

https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/14/4/755

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1550413116304958

 

 

 

 

 

 

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