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Do Life-Extension Supplements Exist?

Do Life-Extension Supplements Exist?

anthony-loera anthony-loera
5 minute read

Do Life-Extension Supplements Exist?

Many people conscious enough to consume a daily multivitamin are probably striving to eat healthily. They probably drink plenty of fresh fruits, vegetables, organic grain products, and lean proteins. This alone, combined with an exercise routine, will make you look younger and more youthful. The real key to combating aging lies in the daily multivitamins. Recent research has shown a benefit to prolonging life from daily life-extension supplements intake [1].

A naturally long lifespan for normal healthy cells is associated with the so-called telomerase shortening mechanism. Telomeres function by ensuring that cell chromosomes do not join or change during cell replication. This is vital since it helps cells to avoid becoming cancerous. Telomeres are the ends of shoes without which lace will fall off.

The way to think of it is that your body's telomeres are similar to shoelace ends; you'll want them to last as long as possible so they have less chance of falling apart. Recent research suggests that the length of telomeres could be a determinant of biological aging and that multivitamins can positively alter the size of telomeres. Telomeres are highly susceptible to oxidative stress, and research has shown that multivitamins can help regulate the effects of oxidative stress and chronic inflammation.

According to research published in the latest American Journal of Clinical Nutrition issue, telomeres in daily multivitamin drinkers could be 5.1 percent longer than in non-users. Of course, there could be an explanation for the long life of telomeres because of the consumption of a healthier diet. Nevertheless, as this was the very first study that focused specifically on the effects of multivitamins on the length of telomeres, it is an excellent indication of the benefits likely to be derived from multivitamins.

The study also demonstrated that the vitamins most likely to affect the length of telomeres are vitamins C and E. Although the evidence to support this assertion is not yet conclusive, there are still promising relationships between these vitamins and the length of telomeres.

If you think you are not feeling younger, it may be wise to take multivitamins daily. It will ensure that you are getting enough vitamins C, E, B12, and D, which are often overlooked by people who do not consume enough protein or have enough sun exposure. It is not surprising that recent research shows that the anti-aging benefits of multivitamins could be more significant than previously thought to reach even the cellular level, allowing you to live longer and even help fight cancer. If you haven't yet tried a daily multivitamin, you might want to think about it. There are various types available; however, selecting a vitamin explicitly designed for a woman or a man is ideal. There are also good multivitamins specifically designed for children. Check with your doctor before including multivitamins in your daily routine.

 

 The Top Anti-Aging Vitamins and Supplements

Although aging is inevitable in life, most of us would like to retain our youth for as long as possible.

It is impossible to stop aging; however, you can make lifestyle adjustments to slow down some aging processes and reduce the chance of developing age-related diseases. This is why in this article, the words “support healthy and healthy aging” instead of “anti-aging” are highlighted [2].

Maintaining a healthy diet rich in nutrients, exercising regularly, and refraining from smoking and drinking alcohol are the most efficient methods to help keep your age healthy and reduce the impact of aging on your body [3] [4].

Additionally, scientists have discovered Life-Extension supplements that can slow the aging process and fight age-related diseases [5].

 

Here are some supplements that can slow down the effects of aging:

  • Curcumin – Curcumin is the most active component of turmeric. It is believed to slow the aging process by activating proteins and protecting itself from cellular damage.
  • EGCG – EGCG is a polyphenols compound found in green tea which can improve mitochondrial function to help healthy older people. In addition, drinking green tea has been associated with a lower probability of dying from the disease.
  • Collagen – Collagen is a well-known dietary supplement that can help prevent skin aging by increasing collagen levels within your skin.
  • CoQ10 – CoQ10 is an antioxidant that the body produces naturally. Supplementation can help slow down the physical decline caused by age and increase the health and quality of life of the elderly.
  • Nicotinamide mononucleotide – Supplementing using NMN could help increase NAD+ levels in your body and help stop genetic changes related to aging.
  • Crocin – Crocin, a saffron-colored pigment, is believed to fight against cell damage and decrease inflammation to improve longevity and stop cognitive decline.
  • Vitamin C – Amounts of vitamin C are usually low among the elderly. A lack of vitamin C can affect a person's health and lead to premature aging.
  • Resveratrol – Resveratrol is a polyphenol antioxidant found in berries, grapes, peanuts, and red wine. It could extend a person's life by activating enzymes called sirtuins.

 

Bottom line

In addition to pursuing an appropriate diet and lifestyle, certain life-extension supplements can help slow the aging process and help people live longer and healthier [6].

Curcumin, Collagen, CoQ10, NMN, Crocin, Vitamin C, and Resveratrol are some ingredients that provide anti-aging benefits.

However, the most effective way to improve longevity and overall well-being is to take care of your body by eating healthy foods, exercising regularly, and reducing stress [7].

 

 

References:

  1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5748990/
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4712935/
  3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5643029/
  4. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29429153/
  5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7271718/
  6. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26482687/
  7. https://agris.fao.org/agris-search/search.do?recordID=US201301353787

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